If you are worried about a risk event you may wish to have a test now
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Australia's Intelligent STI Check - Fast, Convenient and Discreet

When to Get Tested


After someone is exposed to a STI and becomes infected, there is a period of time when a STI / STD infection will not show up on a test, meaning that it cannot be diagnosed. This length of time is called the 'incubation period', also known as a ‘window period’, and can vary from a few days to a few months.

If you are worried about a risk event you may wish to have a STI test now, but in this circumstance we also recommend follow-up testing, to account for the window periods outlined below:

Chlamydia Urine Test:
Possible detection – within the first week
Most likely detection – after 2 weeks

Gonorrhoea Urine Test:
Possible detection – within the first week
Most likely detection – after 2 weeks

HIV Antibody Test:
Possible detection – after 2 weeks
Most likely detection – after 12 weeks

Syphilis Blood Test:
Possible detection – after 1 to 2 weeks
Most likely detection – after 6 weeks

Hepatitis B Blood Test:
Possible detection – after 1 week
Most likely detection – after 6 weeks

Hepatitis C Blood Test:
Possible detection – after 4 to 5 weeks
Most likely detection – after 12 weeks

* Current recommendations are to retest at 3 months (12 weeks) post-exposure, and again at 6 months

Important

Recent HIV and Hepatitis B Exposure

If you believe you have been exposed to HIV or Hepatitis B in the last 72 hours you should stop engaging in sexual activity and immediately see a doctor, hospital or specialised clinic in order to receive preventive post-exposure treatment (PEP). Click here to learn more about PEP.

Symptoms

If you have genital, oral or anal symptoms such as sores, rashes, lumps, itching, unusual discharge or bleeding, discomfort when urinating, lower pain or a sense of general un-wellness, it is important that you stop engaging in sexual activity and see a doctor as soon as possible.

Click here to read more about STI symptoms.