STIs are on the rise across all age groups and social demographics.
Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

x

Australia's Intelligent STI Check - Fast, Convenient and Discreet

Getting Tested


Despite being either curable or manageable once diagnosed, in Australia STIs (sexually transmitted infections) are on the rise across all age groups and social demographics. Along with this emerging epidemic, Australians are also one of the most sexually active nations in the world - the average Australian man will have 25 sexual partners, and Australian women 13.

STIs can and do happen to anyone - at every age, in every race and gender, within all sexual orientations and economic classes, and in all kinds of relationships.

One of the reasons why STIs are so common is because they are often 'silent', making transmission likely and symptomatic detection difficult. People can be infected without showing any signs or symptoms, but if left undiagnosed all STIs can lead to dangerous long-term health issues, including chronic pain, infertility, sterility and even cancer.

As a general rule, it's a good idea to have regular STI screening once you become sexually active, and whenever you change sexual partners. In these circumstances, and as part of your ongoing health management, we recommend the Routine Screen, a comprehensive test which checks for six of the most common STIs that are detectable through blood and urine analysis.


In 2012 more than 82,000 Australians were diagnosed with Chlamydia, and with Chlamydia infection more than tripling in the last decade, this number is estimated to be about one sixth of the real number of infections. Approximately 500,000 Australians are estimated to have Chlamydia, making the significant majority undiagnosed cases.


Gonorrhoea levels are up dramatically, as is the number of cases of Syphilis, which is close to the _highest level in recent history.


Australians are now being diagnosed with HIV at a rate of more than 100 _people per month. In 2012 the number of newly diagnosed cases of HIV in Australia increased by 10% - the largest number of new cases in 20 years.


STIs are spread primarily through person-to-person sexual contact, but can also be passed to a child during pregnancy, birth or breastfeeding, or contracted through poor hygiene and infected sharp objects such as needles and broken glass.

Learn more about the Routine Screen

If you are worried about exposure to a specific STI, please select it from the list below to read more about how and when to test.

Chlamydia and/or Gonorrhoea
HIV and/or Syphilis
Hepatitis B and/or C